Koppers Giethoorn

Would you like to rent a boat in Giethoorn?

Koppers Giethoorn

Would you like to take a canal cruise in Giethoorn?

Koppers Giethoorn

Would you like to rent a boat in Giethoorn?

Koppers Giethoorn

Would you like to take a canal cruise in Giethoorn?

Koppers Giethoorn

Would you like to rent a boat in Giethoorn?

Koppers Giethoorn

Would you like to take a canal cruise in Giethoorn?

Koppers Giethoorn

Would you like to rent a boat Giethoorn?

Koppers Giethoorn

Would you like to rent a boat Giethoorn?

Giethoorn

Welcome to Giethoorn,

Giethoorn, the “Venice of the North,” offers plenty of fantastic opportunities for young and old for a fun day out or an unforgettable vacation.

 

The History of Giethoorn

Around 1230, Giethoorn was founded by refugees, who came from the areas around the
Mediterranean came. These first inhabitants found masses of horns of wild goats here, which were probably found in 1170 during the St. Patrick’s Day. Elizabeth Flood had been drowned.
The first inhabitants, also called Flagellants, called their settlement Geytenhoren. Later this name was bastardized to Geythorn, and eventually the village was named Giethoorn.
The characteristic of the village has its origins in the peat extraction called peat making. This peat making began to boom in the early 1600s.

Peat makers dug (dredged) the peat from the soil (from below the water table)
in places where this peat was of good quality and thickness.
The peat was then processed into peat on strips of land (ribs) that were left standing.

To this end, the dredged-up peat was thrown into a mixing bucket to be mixed into a homogeneous mass after which it was strewn on the ribbing to dry in. After being dried sufficiently, the dry peat layer was then divided into pieces (peat cutting). The peat thus created was then piled in such a way that the wind continued to dry the peat until it was deemed suitable for the stove.
Peat cutting created a large system of small lakes called draw holes separated by the ribs also called legakkers. Furthermore, all canals and ditches were dug to transport the peat.

 

 

Giethoorn
Mixing bowl Giethoorn
Flood Giethoorn

Watershed disaster

Then, around the 1700s and 1800s, several major floods caused most of the ribs around Giethoorn to disappear into the water. After this, the well-known lakes like
Bovenwijde, Beulakerwiede, Belterwiede, Zuideindigerwiede, etc emerged.
In the early 1900s, the peat gradually ran out and many old peat cutters switched to farming. A virtue was made of necessity; everything could be easily transported by punter; water plenty…….

In order to still be able to sail with high loads (cows, hay, reeds, etc.) and of course not to have to bend over every time when punting, many fixed high bridges were built as well as many low bridges (founders) that can be disassembled.
The combination of little bridges, the many waters, the “must” of having to transport practically everything by punter as well as the many natural areas (reed lands, marshlands, etc) give Giethoorn its so characteristic and picturesque appearance.”

The Punter

On the “Casters.”

Traditionally, transportation in Giethoorn has taken place by water. The boat is called a “punter.”

Today, the punter has been replaced by the whisper boat. So, the way to experience Giethoorn in its “Gieters” style is to view the village from the water by renting a whisper boat, (electric boat with noiseless motor), a (sailing) punt, or taking a boat tour.

Have you become curious about Giethoorn and want to join a canal cruise?

Punter Giethoorn